Using Azure Functions in Mirosoft Dynamics Business Central

Microsoft Azure is a cloud computing service that is used for building, testing, deploying, and managing applications.

It provides software as a service (SaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), and infrastructure as a service (IaaS). Azure Functions is a solution that runs on the Microsoft Azure platform and is used to run small pieces of code, or functions, in the cloud. With Azure Functions, you can focus on a specific function without having to focus on the whole application or the infrastructure to run it.

Source : Jyotsna’s Blog
Read more…

Blog Series Part 5 Calling Base Function for AL in MSDYN365BC.

I have added Codeunit ISI Events to call the subscriber.

IsCustomerExist will first check if contact exists or not, if it doesnot exist then it will proceed further and create contact and function CreateCustomer will create new customer and select the default template from General ledger Setup table.

Source : Divyesh Chitte
Read more…

Monitoring Dynamics 365 Business Central AL Functions Performance with App Insights

Recently I was involved in the project to build a Dynamics 365 Business Central App, which gathered all inventory information from Purchase to Sale, including transfers, production orders, etc. in one place, with one goal – to understand the profitability of each line in each purchase order.

Source : Simplanova
Read more…

A quick way to deploy your Azure Functions in the cloud

After my last webcast about Azure Functions, I received an interesting question: how can I quickly deploy a function to Azure? Or maybe to different Azure subscriptions or regions?

We saw in the webcast how you can deploy an Azure Function by using Visual Studio or Visual Studio Code directly. But Azure Functions have also a full range of continuous deployment and integration options provided by Azure App Service and you can deploy an Azure Function directly from a CI/CD pipeline in Azure DevOps. But there’s also a quickest way in my opinion: Zip deployment.

Source : Stefano Demiliani
Read more…

An M Function To Help You Explore Power Query Diagnostics Data

Last week’s post showed an M function that took Power Query diagnostics data and formatted in a way that made it suitable for visualisation in a Power BI Decomposition Tree visual. This is great for understanding what’s going on at a high level, but by doing this you also lose a lot of detailed information from the diagnostics logs that could be useful for performance tuning.

Source : Chris Webb’s BI Blog
Read more…