Power BI, HTTP/2, Internet Explorer 11 And Older Versions Of Windows

A very quick performance tip: do you have users consuming Power BI reports with Internet Explorer 11 and an older Windows OS like Windows 8.1 or Windows 7? If so, their reports are likely to be slower because over the last few months some important performance optimisations were made in Power BI that rely on the HTTP/2 protocol, and while all modern browsers like Edge and Chrome have supported HTTP/2 for a long time now, Internet Explorer 11 only supports HTTP/2 on Windows 10.

Source : Chris Webb’s BI Blog
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Making One Power BI Measure Appear In Multiple Folders

Back in 2018, when I wrote a detailed post on how to create nested display folders for measures in Power BI, I mentioned that unlike in Analysis Services it was not possible to make a Power BI measure appear in two or more folders simultaneously. The other day on Twitter Deepak Agrawal pointed out that at some point since I wrote that post the situation has changed, so here’s a quick post showing how it now works.

Source : Chris Webb’s BI Blog
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Visualising Power BI Premium And Azure Analysis Services Query Parallelism

In my last post I showed how to connect SQL Server Profiler up to a Power BI Premium dataset but I didn’t give you any examples of why this might be useful. In this post I’ll show you how you can use a Profiler trace to visualise all the queries run by a Power BI report, see when they start to run, see which ones run in parallel with each other and see what the overall time taken to run all the queries is.

Source : Chris Webb’s BI Blog
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Adding Your Own Messages To Power Query Query Diagnostics

A quick point: while the Power Query Query Diagnostics functionality is relatively new, it’s based on Power BI/Power Query trace logging that has been around for a while. I’ve just realised that this means you can use the Diagnostics.Trace M function that I blogged about back in 2016 to add your own messages to the output of Query Diagnostics.

Source : Chris Webb’s BI Blog
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Make Your Power BI Report Run Faster By Showing The Same Data In Fewer Visuals

Before we go any further, I don’t want you to go and change your reports if you’re not going to get any benefit from doing so. Use Performance Analyzer (as shown here) to determine which visuals on your report are the cause of slow performance – there’s no point redesigning visuals that are fast anyway.

Source : Chris Webb’s BI Blog
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Power BI desktop February 2020 is out and incremental refresh is now generally available!

Microsoft has announced the release of Power BI Desktop: February 2020 and you can read all about it here:

https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/power-bi-desktop-february-2020-feature-summary/

I am very happy about incremental refresh, which is now generally available and is now supported for Power BI Pro licensing, meaning it is no longer a Premium only feature!

Source : Think about IT
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An M Function To Help You Explore Power Query Diagnostics Data

Last week’s post showed an M function that took Power Query diagnostics data and formatted in a way that made it suitable for visualisation in a Power BI Decomposition Tree visual. This is great for understanding what’s going on at a high level, but by doing this you also lose a lot of detailed information from the diagnostics logs that could be useful for performance tuning.

Source : Chris Webb’s BI Blog
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